Ecosystem Services Program News

Think Blue: Finding Growth in the Caribbean Sea

In the Huffington Post, Pawan Patil writes that the “blue” economy looks to balance ocean wealth and ocean health by sustainably managing ocean assets (e.g. fish stocks and coral reefs) and ecosystem services (e.g. coastal protection, the potential for carbon capture, and oxygen production). And according to a new report by the World Bank "Toward a Blue Economy: A Promise for Sustainable Growth in the Caribbean" which was written in collaboration with the Nicholas Institute and others, millions of people in the Caribbean could benefit.

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Ocean Preservation Key To Caribbean Resilience

A new World Bank report, co-authored by a Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions researcher, examines how the Caribbean's transition to a blue economy can generate growth while helping countries gain greater resilience with better ocean preservation, reports the Jamaica Gleaner.

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Caribbean Sea Earns US$400B a Year; But Economic Activity, Pollution Threats Loom

A report released yesterday has put the economic value of the Caribbean Sea to the region—to include all its services, from fishing, transport, trade, tourism, mining, waste disposal, energy, carbon sequestration and drug development—at US$407 billion per year based on 2012 data, or just shy of 18 percent of the region’s total GDP. Co-authored by a researcher at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, The Jamaica Observer reports that the figure is an underestimation because the region’s ocean economy to date “is not well measured or understood”. Nonetheless, it is projected to nearly double by 2050. In tandem with that increase in economic activity and earning is a projected rise in the number of threats to the ocean from the very activities which it supports.

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New Report Identifies Key Opportunities to Boost Growth in the Caribbean Sea while Preserving its Ecosystem

Dominican Today reports on a new World Bank report, co-authored by a Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions researcher, that examines how the transition to a ‘blue economy’ for Caribbean countries can not only generate growth, but also help countries gain greater resilience to external shocks by better preserving the ocean.

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New Report Identifies Key Opportunities to Boost Growth in the Caribbean Sea while Preserving its Ecosystem

In the lead up to this week’s ‘Our Ocean’ conference hosted by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Washington D.C., a new World Bank report, co-authored by a Nicholas Institute research, examines how the transition to a ‘blue economy’ for Caribbean countries can not only generate growth, but also help countries gain greater resilience to external shocks by better preserving the ocean.

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Christy Ihlo Joins Environmental Conservation Effort in Tanzania

The village of Loibor Siret is a community in the heart of the semi-arid grasslands and acacia woodlands of the Maasai Steppe. It is in this rural village—a three-hour drive from Arusha, the nearest city—where Christy Ihlo has found a new role supporting environmental conservation and sustainable livelihoods among Northern Tanzania’s rural communities and wildlife. For nearly a year, Christy has served as the Director of Monitoring and Evaluation at the African People & Wildlife Fund (APW). Her work helps to assess the effectiveness of APW’s programs, which are designed to achieve balance between environmental conservation and sustainable livelihoods. In this role, she is using skills that she honed as a policy associate at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions.

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Roady to Join Duke to Identify, Tackle Pressing Environmental Issues

Steve Roady brings a wealth of environmental law and policy experience to his new joint appointment at Duke’s Law School and the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. As professor of the practice at the Law School and a faculty fellow at the Nicholas Institute, Roady, who has taught environmental litigation and ocean and coastal law and policy as a senior lecturing fellow at the Law School since 2003, will continue to teach. He will also be charged with creating interdisciplinary teams to examine approaches to large-scale environmental problems.

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Search Begins for Climate and Energy Program Lead

Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions has launched a search for their next Climate and Energy Program director. “We are at an incredibly important point in global climate and energy policy,” said Nicholas Institute Director Profeta. “This opening allows for someone to lead a team that plays a role in critical environmental debates centered around the Clean Power Plan and other environmental regulations, the transition of the future electric grid, and next steps for U.S. climate policy.”

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University Offers Support for Third-Party Energy Sales with Open Letter to State Representative

A Duke letter, supporting the legalization of third-party energy sales in North Carolina, states that the university has made a commitment to achieve carbon neutrality by 2024 through “internal operational changes, community-wide initiatives, investments in innovative offsets with public and private partners and working with our electricity supplier to encourage reductions in emissions over time.” Nicholas Institute Director Tim Profeta told The Chronicle that Duke's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions result from transportation and power usage on campus. To work toward a net zero carbon footprint, he said, the university created the Duke Carbon Offsets Initiative to invest in projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions elesewhere.

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U.N. Climate Deal: Are we Done?

In the largest ever single-day turn-out for a signing ceremony, more than 170 governments on April 22 signed the Paris Agreement, which has a goal of limiting average surface temperatures to “well below” 2 degrees Celsius. Voice of America asked experts if the agreement solves climate change globally. Brian Murray, director of the Environmental Economics Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, says the real test is “whether the countries will actually take action."In the largest ever single-day turn-out for a signing ceremony, more than 170 governments on April 22 signed the Paris Agreement, which has a goal of limiting average surface temperatures to “well below” 2 degrees Celsius. Voice of America asked experts if the agreement solves climate change globally. Brian Murray, director of the Environmental Economics Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, says the real test is “whether the countries will actually take action."

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