Events

Date & Time
Friday, March 22, 2019 - 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Location
Field Auditorium, Grainger Hall (formerly Environment Hall), 9 Circuit Drive, Durham, North Carolina
Bringing an Economic Focus to our Nation’s Water Challenges: An RFF Water Initiative

Ann M. Bartuska, Vice President for Land, Water, and nature at Resources for the Future, will present "Bringing an Economic Focus to our Nation’s Water Challenges: An RFF Water Initiative" on Friday, March 22, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. EST in Duke University's Grainger Hall, Room 2102.

Date & Time
Tuesday, March 5, 2019 - 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location
Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, Santa Rosa, California
Power Outages: Grid Reliability and Emergency Management

Kate Konschnik, Director of the Climate & Energy Program at the Nicholas Institute, will present "Power Outages: Grid Reliability and Emergency Management" at FEMA PrepTalks: New Perspectives for Emergency Managers.

PrepTalks are given by subject-matter experts and thought leaders to spread new ideas, spark conversation, and promote innovative leadership for the issues confronting emergency managers now and over the next 20 years.

More information and registration information (PDF)

Date & Time
Thursday, February 21, 2019 - 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Location
Duke University in DC 1201 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004
Electrification and Development: Building an evidence-based electrification agenda that supports productivity and income growth

Universal access to electricity has gained increasing prominence as a global ambition, underscored by the establishment of SDG 7 “to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all”. Embedded within the logic of this goal is the anticipated impact of electrification on productivity (and thus on incomes) among households and businesses that gain access to electricity or improved reliability. Further, actors concerned with the economic viability of electrification projects have highlighted the value of productive use in increasing off-peak demand, and thereby improving the viability of business models. In this respect, productive use has been viewed as the engine in a virtuous cycle in the fight against both energy poverty specifically, and against poverty more generally.

The literature considering the impacts of electrification, however, suggests that the relationship between electrification and productive use may be complex, with impact studies characterized by highly variable results. In particular, reviews of the literature on electrification and productive use indicate that impacts are often difficult to achieve among poor, remote populations where the existing economic base is small. It is critical to understand complementary conditions; energy access in a vacuum may be a poor investment, while coupling electrification strategies with other interventions may offer a more effective route to improving long-run economic viability of the investment as well as community development. Alternatively, energy access or quality improvement interventions should perhaps be targeted to locations where other necessary conditions for economic growth exist.

The mixed findings in the literature raise questions for policy-makers, advocates and practitioners who are focused on achieving universal electrification. These include:

Date & Time
Friday, January 25, 2019 - 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Location
Field Auditorium, Grainger Hall (formerly Environment Hall), 9 Circuit Drive, Durham, North Carolina
Beyond Coal? Exploring Global Variation in Protests Against Proposed Coal-Fired Power Plants

Jennifer Hadden, Associate Professor in the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland, will present "Beyond Coal? Exploring Global Variation in Protests Against Proposed Coal-Fired Power Plants" on Friday, January 25.
 
Due to the heavy greenhouse footprint of coal-fired electricity, reducing the amount of coal in the fuel mix will be necessary for many countries to achieve their climate policy goals and, by extension, for the successful implementation of the Paris Agreement.  Public opposition to coal in some locations – including sites in India, Indonesia, and the United States – has become an important factor in project development.  In other places, support for coal is more widespread.  What explains variation in public opposition to proposed coal-fired power plants? This project argues that transnational politics play a significant role in spurring public protest.  In particular, the presence of foreign INGOs drives public opposition to coal, as does the presence of a foreign project developer.  This paper draws on an original global dataset of proposed coal fired power plants to make these claims, showing that transnational factors surpass both local grievances and domestic political opportunities in their influence on mobilization.  These findings have implications for scholars of social movements and environmental politics, as well as policy implications for campaigners, developers, and policy-makers.

This talk is part of the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and the University Program in Environmental Policy seminar series featuring leading experts discussing a variety of pressing environmentally focused topics. This talk is also sponsored by the Nicholas School of the Environment and the Sanford School for Public Policy.

Date & Time
Friday, January 25, 2019 - 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Location
Yale University Kroon Hall, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511
The 3rd Yale Symposium on the Impact of Chinese Overseas Investment: Greening The Belt & Road

The 3rd Yale Symposium on the Impact of Chinese Overseas Investment will explore the ways in which China’s impact on the world is evolving as Chinese companies and investors continue to shape global supply chains and local economies. We seek diverse perspectives from NGOs, businesses, and academia to provide nuanced analyses of various topics, including but not limited to: what the Belt and Road Initiative actually is; China’s changing environmental governance and policies; climate considerations in infrastructure development; the implications of the Belt and Road for biodiversity and ecosystems, among others.

Date
Sunday, January 6 to Tuesday, January 8, 2019
Location
Sanford School of Public Policy, 201 Science Drive, Durham, NC 27708
Mobilizing Technology and Business Models to Close the Energy Gap

Globally, 1.1 billion people around the world lack basic electricity, and billions more lack access to the reliable, affordable, and sustainable energy systems that form the backbone of job creation and broader economic growth. How this shortfall is addressed over the coming decades will have resounding impacts on broader development outcomes, the environment, and U.S. and global security. The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, the Duke University Office of Undergraduate Education, and the Energy Access Project at Duke University will host the 2019 Winter Forum "Mobilizing Technology and Business Models to Close the Energy Gap" on Sunday, January 6, 2019, to Tuesday, January 8, 2019. 

From solar and batteries to telecom and mobile money, technology is enabling new approaches and business models for solving the energy access challenge. Duke students can apply to scale-up their knowledge, sharpen their story-telling, and unleash their creativity in a competition for solutions to end global energy poverty. Applications are accepted August 27 to October 5 (deadline extended).

For more information, visit the Winter Forum website.

Date & Time
Thursday, December 13, 2018 - 9 a.m. to 3:45 p.m.
Location
Kimpton Hotel Monaco, 700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004
An Expert Stakeholder Workshop for States & Stakeholders in the PJM Region “Looking Ahead: Big Challenges for 2019”

Join the Great Plains Institute and Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions for an expert workshop for state officials and stakeholders exploring recent energy and environmental policy developments in the PJM region and the potential challenges in 2019.

Date & Time
Friday, December 7, 2018 - 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Location
Field Auditorium, Grainger Hall (formerly Environment Hall), 9 Circuit Drive, Durham, North Carolina
Quantifying the Rebound Effects of Residential Solar Panel Adoption

Yueming (Lucy) Qiu, assistant professor in the School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland College Park, will present "Quantifying the Rebound Effects of Residential Solar Panel Adoption" on Friday, December 7.

Date & Time
Thursday, December 6, 2018 - 11:50 a.m. to 1:10 p.m.
Location
Grand Ballroom Salon H, Crystal Gateway Marriott Hotel, 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, Virginia 22202
Remediation to Restoration
Lydia Olander, director of the Ecosystem Services Program at Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, will speak during the session "Remediation to Restoration" on Thursday, December 6, at the 2018 A Community on Ecosystem Services Conference (ACES). Olander, who leads a project on Gulf of Mexico restoration, will discuss Linking Restoration Impacts to Economic, Health, and Wellbeing Benefits for People in the Gulf of Mexico.
 
For more information on the workshop, visit the conference website. Follow the conversation on Twitter with the hashtag #2018ACES.