Events

Date & Time
Monday, April 9, 2018 - 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Location
Love Auditorium (B101 LSRC) and Hall of Science, West Campus
Truth Seeking in an Age of Tribalism: Lessons from the Flint Water Crisis

Marc Edwards, Charles Lunsford Professor of Civil Engineering at Virginia Tech, will present "Truth Seeking in an Age of Tribalism: Lessons from the Flint Water Crisis," on Monday, April 9, at Duke University. A light reception will precede the lecture at 5:15 p.m. A short Q&A will follow. The free event is open to the public and seating is on a first come, first served basis. RSVP required.

Edwards is the Charles Lunsford Professor of Civil Engineering at Virginia Tech, where he teaches courses in environmental engineering, applied aquatic chemistry and engineering ethics. His research group aspires to pursue science as a public good, through laboratory work on practically important but underfunded topics such as corrosion in buildings and opportunistic premise-plumbing pathogens—that work laid the groundwork for investigative science uncovering the 2001-2004 D.C. Lead Crisis and the 2014-2016 Flint Water Disaster. Time Magazine dubbed Edwards “The Plumbing Professor” in 2004, and listed him amongst the 4 most important “Innovators” in water from around the world.  The White House awarded him a Presidential Faculty Fellowship in 1996 and he won a MacArthur Fellowship in 2007.  His paper on lead poisoning of children in Washington D.C., due to elevated lead in drinking water, was judged the outstanding science paper in Environmental Science and Technology in 2010. In 2013 Edwards’ was the 9th recipient (in a quarter century) of the IEEE Barus Award for “courageously defending the public interest at great personal risk.”

This event is co-sponsored by the Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke Law School and the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions.

Date & Time
Wednesday, April 4, 2018 - 8 a.m. to Friday, April 6, 2018 - 5 p.m.
Location
InterContinental San Francisco, 888 Howard Street (corner of 5th and Howard), San Francisco, California 94103
North American Carbon World Conference

The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions will present the program for the 2018 North American Carbon World (NACW) conference in San Francisco, April 4-6, in partnership with NACW organizer Climate Action Reserve. The conference will address the most pressing issues in climate policy and carbon markets to the largest gathering of climate professionals in North America. 

Tim Profeta, director of the Nicholas Institute, will participate in the panel "Rising from the Ashes: State Responses to the Clean Power Plan Dismantling" on April 5. The session will explore the battle over Clean Power Plan federal regulations, review the challenge to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's endangerment finding, and explore how state-level initiatives and best practices are addressing climate change in lieu of a federal mandate.

Date & Time
Friday, March 30, 2018 - 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Location
LaBarre Auditorium, Social Science 139, Duke University, Durham, NC
Large Power Outages of Long Duration: Assessing and Reducing the Risks

M. Granger Morgan, Hamerschlag University Professor of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, will present "Large Power Outages of Long Duration: Assessing and Reducing the Risks" at Duke University's LaBarre Auditorium, Social Science 139 March 30.

While we should do everything within reason to avoid large blackouts of the power system, there is no way that such events can be completely eliminated. Large outages have happened in the past as a result of ice storms, hurricanes, and operator error. In the future other causes such as large solar mass ejections and perhaps terrorist physical and cyber attack could also give rise to large outages of long duration. Morgan will discuss a recent U.S. National Academies study on this topic, touching on strategies based on “smart grid technology."

This talk is part of the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and the University Program in Environmental Policy seminar series featuring leading experts discussing a variety of pressing environmentally focused topics. This talk is also sponsored by the Risk@Duke Interdisciplinary Community Planning Project.

Date & Time
Tuesday, March 6, 2018 - 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Location
Gross Hall, 140 Science Drive, Duke University Room 100C
Carbon Taxes in Theory and in Practice: Lessons from the I-732 Ballot Measure in Washington State

Yoram Bauman, a PhD environmental economist who founded Carbon Washington, will present "Carbon Taxes in Theory and in Practice: Lessons from the I-732 Ballot Measure in Washington State," on Tuesday, March 6, in Duke University's Gross Hall

In 2015 the grassroots group Carbon Washington stunned the political establishment in Washington State by gathering 360,000 signatures to put a carbon tax on the November 2016 ballot. This seminar will focus on the policy and politics of Initiative 732 and the implications for future state-level efforts in Washington State, in Utah, and perhaps even in North Carolina.

This talk is part of the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and the University Program in Environmental Policy seminar series featuring leading experts discussing a variety of pressing environmentally focused topics. This talk is also sponsored by the Nicholas School of the Environment and the Sanford School of Public Policy.

Date & Time
Friday, February 23, 2018 - 10 a.m. to 1:15 p.m.
Location
Field Auditorium, first floor of Environment Hall, 9 Circuit Drive, Durham, NC (Duke University Campus)
Research Opportunities with the Southeast Climate Science Center

Join Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions 10 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Friday, February 23, to learn about the Department of the Interior's Southeast Climate Science Center, one of eight regional climate science centers managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center.

North Carolina State University acts as the host institution for the center. Duke University just joined as a member. At this event, researchers from North Carolina State University, USGS, and Duke University will give lightning talks about their work on climate science, climate impacts on ecosystems and people, and decision making for climate adaptation. The program will also feature discussion on ideas for new collaborative research in the Southeast. 

Lunch will be provided. Space is limited, so please register in advance.  

Date & Time
Friday, February 23, 2018 - 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Location
Levine Science Research Center, Room A158, Duke University Campus, Durham, NC
The Politics of Flood Mapping and Its Implications for Climate Change Adaptation

Sarah Pralle, associate professor of political science at Syracuse University, will present "The Politics of Flood Mapping and Its Implications for Climate Change Adaptation," on Friday, February 23 in the Levine Science Research Center on Duke University's West campus. 

Local communities are on the front lines of climate change adaptation, but we know relatively little about their willingness and ability to adapt to increased flooding and other climate risks. In this talk, Pralle will explore the Federal Emergency Management Agency flood remapping program and examine the ways local communities in the U.S. have responded to it. Because the flood mapping program is the cornerstone of the National Flood Insurance Program, local conversations often revolve around the costs of flood insurance rather than the risk of flooding. Moreover, the maps themselves are designed to establish insurance rates, not communicate current and future flood risks. Pralle will share thoughts on how policymakers might rethink flood insurance and flood mapping so as to promote more equitable and effective adaptation.

This talk is part of the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and the University Program in Environmental Policy seminar series featuring leading experts discussing a variety of pressing environmentally focused topics. 

Date & Time
Friday, February 23, 2018 - 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location
Duke in DC, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Suite 500, Washington, DC 20004
Accelerating Global Energy Access

Please join the launch of the Energy Access Project Friday, February 23, 2018, in Washington, D.C.

Jim Rogers, former CEO and chairman of the board for electric utility Duke Energy, will deliver the keynote address. A CEO in the power sector for almost 25 years, Rogers has been an advocate for energy-efficiency investment, modernization of electric infrastructure, and global energy access.

With nearly a third of humanity lacking reliable electricity and three billion people without clean fuels and technologies for cooking, energy access represents one of the greatest challenges of our time. In response, Duke University has launched its Energy Access Project, a research and policy project focused on supporting viable pathways to sustainable and modern energy solutions for all. This event will be an opportunity to learn about what's already underway at Duke and join Rogers and other experts across government, industry, and nonprofits to help shape the Energy Access Project's 2018 agenda.

Date & Time
Thursday, February 22, 2018 - 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Location
Webinar
Conservation International Rapid Ecosystem Services Assessments and Mapping

Rachel Neugarten, Conservation International’s director of Conservation Priority Setting, will discuss the organization's approach to mapping important places for ecosystem services in a webinar 3-4 p.m. ET on Thursday, February 22. The discussion will include how this approach informs conservation priority-setting for Conservation International, as well as trends in protected area spatial representation of ecosystem services in five countries.

Date & Time
Friday, February 2, 2018 - 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Location
Levine Science Research Center, DEL Classroom A158
The Roads to and From the Paris Climate Agreement

Andrew Light, professor of philosophy, public policy, and atmospheric sciences at George Mason University and a distinguished senior fellow with the World Resources Institute, will present the lecture "The Roads to and From the Paris Climate Agreement" on Friday, February 2 from 10-11 a.m. in the Levine Science Research Center on Duke University's west campus. 

In December 2015 over 190 countries met in Paris for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change where they succeeded in creating a new international climate agreement. The agreement is now undergoing an early and serious stress test with the announcement of the intended withdraw of the United States from the agreement. Light will discuss the significance of the Paris Agreement and why it is worth fighting for its preservation. He will also look at what the future holds for global climate cooperation, including new opportunities for enhanced climate action.

This talk is part of the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and the University Program in Environmental Policy seminar series featuring leading experts discussing a variety of pressing environmentally focused topics. 

Date & Time
Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Location
Webinar
Mapping Ecosystem Services in Maryland to Inform Decision Making

Elliott Campbell and Rachel Marks from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will discuss the DNR’s new online tool for ecosystem service quantification in a webinar 3-4 p.m. ET Wednesday, January 31.