News - Robert Bonnie

A commentary in The Daily Yonder reviewed the Nicholas Institute's recent report, “Understanding Rural Attitudes Toward the Environment and Conservation in America,” and its implications for the divide between rural and urban Americans on environmental policy.

Rural and urban Americans are divided in their views on the environment, but common ground does exist, says a new report led by Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions.

America's working forests provide clean air and water, support species diversity, provide jobs, and are an essential part of efforts to address climate change. In an op-ed for RealClearMarkets, Robert Bonnie and Matthew McKenna write that capital markets have the power to leverage philanthropy and government action to help conserve this critical natural infrastructure.

The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions is giving Duke University students a workout—for their environmental policy knowledge.

More than 40 students crammed into the fifth-floor boardroom of Grainger Hall on a Friday afternoon to get answers to their questions about the inner workings of Congress. The session was the first in a series of Policy Boot Camps that will feature Nicholas Institute professionals sharing their expertise engaging directly with decision-making institutions. 

Push-ups are being replaced by policy at the Nicholas Institute’s boot camps. 

Aimed at increasing student fluency in engaging with policy making institutions, the boot camps will draw from the experience of four policy experts and cover ways to engage with Congress, federal agencies and international institutions, reports The Chronicle.

Tim Profeta, director of the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, kicked off the first boot camp Oct. 25 to focus on the workings of Congress.

The Nicholas Institute is pleased to welcome Robert Bonnie as an executive in residence following a two-year Rubenstein Fellowship at Duke. Bonnie specializes in issues related to climate change and natural resource conservation, with a focus on rural America.

The Trump administration has refused to publicize dozens of government-funded studies that carry warnings about the effects of climate change, defying a longstanding practice of touting such findings by the Agriculture Department's acclaimed in-house scientists, POLITICO reports.

America's nearly 1.3 million square miles of forests absorb about 15 percent of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions annually, storing carbon in growing trees, ecosystems, and wood products. By maintaining and expanding this forest carbon "sink," America can reduce greenhouse gas emissions more effectively and for less money, write Robert Bonnie, a Duke University Rubenstein fellow and former undersecretary of Natural Resources and Environment at USDA, and Jad Daley, president and CEO of American Forests, in an op-ed for The Hill.

Robert Bonnie, a Nicholas School of the Environment alumnus and former Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, returns to Duke as a Rubenstein Fellow to address issues related to climate change and natural resource conservation in rural America. Bonnie is the fifth expert to join Duke’s Rubenstein Fellows Academy, which brings leaders with deep expertise in issues of global importance to campus each year for in-depth engagement with students and faculty.  His 12-month term begins April 3. As a Rubenstein Fellow, Bonnie will work with students, staff and faculty in the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, the Nicholas School and the Sanford School of Public Policy to develop strategies to tackle conservation challenges for rural America that rely on collaboration and incentives to address environmental issues while providing economic opportunity. Bonnie will also share his experiences in environmental policymaking with students through seminars and career advising sessions.