News - Elizabeth Losos

Developing countries are forecast to emit more carbon dioxide than developed ones by mid-century. Chinese investment is projected to speed up that process in key countries linked to the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), China’s global infrastructure plan, according to a new report.

Adding "green" projects to China's global infrastructure push won’t be enough to make the effort environmentally sound, concluded a panel of experts at a June 19 event on the ecological considerations of China's Belt and Road Initiative. Senior fellows at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions Jackson Ewing and Elizabeth Losos were among the panel speakers.

The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University has awarded funding to six research projects for Fiscal Year 2019–20 through the institute's Catalyst Program.

Now in its third year, the Catalyst Program aims to build on the Nicholas Institute’s mission by increasing engagement with Duke faculty to incubate and advance new partnerships, enhance policy-relevant knowledge, and create innovative policy solutions based on new creative synergies.

On April 25-27, Chinese leaders met in Beijing with heads of state and delegations from more than 40 countries to discuss next steps in implementing the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), China’s $1 trillion infrastructure investment program.

Chinese President Xi Jinping will convene an international forum on April 25-27 in Beijing to discuss next steps for the Belt and Road Initiative, China’s plan to strengthen ties with other countries in its region through infrastructure investments. The forum will include sessions on addressing BRI’s environmental impacts.

To clarify environmental risks from Belt and Road Initiative road and rail development and examine best practices to address risks, World Bank researchers from Duke University have produced the working paper Reducing Environmental Risks from BRI Investments in Transportation Infrastructure.

Environmental risks vary both among and within different economic corridors of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), China’s initiative to strengthen regional cooperation through infrastructure and investment.

China's New Silk Road

A conference at Duke Kunshan University last week—co-sponsored by the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions—focused on China's global investments. The five-day conference addressed how to better understand and plan for China’s vast increase in infrastructure investment abroad, especially for projects that are part of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). 

Duke Kunshan University (DKU) administrators received some help from their own students as they planned the second phase of the Kunshan, China, campus expansion this spring.

Can China’s international development efforts be environmentally sustainable and will its unique approach to emissions trading work?