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N.C. to Fight Obama Climate Change Plan that Cuts Carbon Emissions

The Obama administration on Monday issued the first limits on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants in a major climate change initiative that North Carolina might try to ignore.The Environmental Protection Agency’s rule would lower U.S. carbon emissions 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. Reductions would have to start in 2022. “One thing the legislation could do is to take away the choices for how North Carolina can devise a cost-effective plan from DENR and put it with the EPA," Jonas Monast of Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions tells the Charlotte Observer.

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Renewable Energy Shoulders More Weight In Carbon Plan ($)

Renewable energy on Monday was given a bigger role in the Obama administration's final plan to curb carbon emissions at existing power plants, a change experts said is largely due to the industry's successful effort to convince federal regulators of its viability as an alternative to traditional energy sources. Brian Murray, director of the Environmental Economics Program at Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions told Law 360 that with the new data and with input from the renewable industry, the administration simply determined that renewables are a more cost-effective solution than they believed 14 months ago when they wrote the proposed rule.

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North Carolina Will Fight New EPA Clean Power Plan

North Carolina state lawmakers and officials are vowing to fight the Obama Administration’s new clean power plant rules. A bill making its way through the state Senate would prohibit DENR from developing any plan to meet the new EPA rules. The state House, meanwhile, as well as DENR, favors moving ahead with creating a state plan while the EPA rules are adjudicated in the courts. Jonas Monast, director of the Climate and Energy Program at Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions comments for WUNC: "This rule marks an important turning point in the U.S. climate debate.The EPA’s Clean Power Plan answers the question of whether the nation should act to reduce CO2 emissions from the power sector. Now it will be up to state governments to decide exactly how to do so.”

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News Tip: Experts Available for Comment on Final Clean Power Plan

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday will release its final Clean Power Plan, which limits greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants under section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act.

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The Long, Hazy and Winding Political Path that Brought the Obama Admin to the Clean Power Plan ($)

When the Obama administration releases the final Clean Power Plan regulating greenhouse gas emissions at electric power plants today, it will mark the enactment of the nation's most ambitious climate program in history. It's supposed to cut the sector's greenhouse gas emissions by 32 percent. Billy Pizer, faculty fellow at Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, comments in ClimateWire.

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Final Carbon Rule’s Release is Imminent

Supporters and critics of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s carbon reduction mandates are anxiously awaiting the EPA’s final rule, expected out as early as today.The EPA has received in excess of 4 million public comments since June 2014, when it released its initial proposal on how to reduce carbon emissions nationwide by 30 percent by 2030. Many suggestions from state governments, industry and environmental groups could influence the mandates and requirements contained in the final document, Jonas Monast, director of the climate and energy program at Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, told the Albuquerque Journal.

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Barack Obama Plan Pushes US States Towards Carbon Pricing

President Barack Obama’s climate goals are prompting U.S. states to explore the use of carbon markets as a way to comply—an approach that will be resisted by Republicans. The final version of the administration’s plan, to be announced on Monday, is central to Mr. Obama’s legacy and commitments the U.S. has made in the run-up to a Paris meeting in December on an international climate accord. Brian Murray, director of the Environmental Economics Program at Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, comments in this Financial Times article.

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Q&A with Nicholas Institute Alumnus David Gordon

As an associate in research at Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, David Gordon spent his time studying blue carbon—payments to incentivize holders of coastal habitats to avoid habitat conversion—and conceptualizing next-generation water and wastewater utilities. Now, he’s applying this knowledge to integrated planning projects as a utility management analyst with Hawksley Consulting Company.

How did you end up pursuing work in the environmental field?

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Timing is the Element Most Likely to Change in EPA's Final Clean Power Plan ($)

In countless meetings on the Clean Power Plan with states and energy companies, the most common plea to U.S. EPA has been for more time. More time to work on plans, more time to allow coal plants to retire and more time to move toward final goals. Jonas Monast, director of the Climate and Energy Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, discusses what to look for in the final Clean Power Plan rule in ClimateWire.

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NC Wind Farm Could Mean Changing Winds in Ga. Energy Future

Wind farms dot the landscape in states across the country, but you won’t find one in the Southeast, at least not yet, according to a wind industry trade group. That is until now. On NPR, Jonas Monast, director of the Climate and Energy Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, discusses the implications of this new $400 million, 200-plus megawatt facility in North Carolina.

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