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Climate change legislation, awaiting resumption of debate when the Senate returns from its August recess, “has both great opportunities and great risks, and we want to be sure that if anything passes it is what’s best for landowners and tree farmers,” says Erica Rhoad, director of policy for the Society of American Foresters.

A recent Congressional Budget Office study projected that carbon offsets could be a $60 billion market in 2012, on a par with U.S. corn and wheat markets, and “as it grows beyond that, it will make forestry mitigation opportunities more important,” says Jeffrey O’Hara, senior economist, Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX).

Critics say the U.S. power grid is outdated, in part because its many owners have trouble attracting investors. A Duke University report published this week presents a solution: publicly traded real-estate investment trusts that would own the power lines and collect rent from energy companies.

The US will need to expand and modernize its outdated power transmission grid to incorporate more renewable energy sources, but balkanized ownership and regulation are going to make that process slow and difficult, according to a new Duke University analysis.

The U.S. will need to expand and modernize its outdated power transmission grid to incorporate more renewable energy sources, but balkanized ownership and regulation are going to make that process slow and difficult, according to a new Duke University analysis.

Environmentalists are already hoping that the Senate tackles both energy and climate change this fall, rather than simply dealing with the clean energy bits (which are popular) and punting on the climate-change stuff (which isn’t so popular).

The Climate Post is a weekly roundup of climate news, produced by the The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University.

Part I of a two-part series on the development of electric energy storage, starting with the storage we need and continuing Part II on Aug. 31 with a look at the technologies and the political challenges they face.

Barack Obama might be the most powerful man in the world, but he faces tough opposition from all sides over climate-change legislation

Alfred Hitchcock filled his movies with suspense by picking some object of life-or-death consequence--microfilm, documents, uranium-filled wine bottles--and setting his characters in pursuit. The great director had a nickname for this plot-driver: the MacGuffin. The funny thing is, as long as his characters found the MacGuffin something to kill for, Hitchcock never particularly cared what the consequences were.