Ocean and Coastal Policy Program News

World Bank says Pacific can Earn Much More from Tuna

A new World Bank report says better management of tuna fisheries can help Pacific countries earn up to $344 million annually and outlines a best-case scenario for the year 2040, where tuna fisheries will play a greater role in the region's economic growth. The report, co-authored by the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions' Ocean and Coastal Policy Program director John Virdin,recommends five policy strategies to help the region play a bigger role in economic growth: more regional integration; efficient fishing practices and catch limits; flexible access and eventual output rights for fleets; investment in skills and capacity; and the inclusion of coastal communities in fisheries planning.

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Better Cooperation on Fisheries Could Help the Pacific Net Additional $344 Million Every Year

PORT VILA, May 12, 2016 – A new World Bank report says better management of tuna fisheries can help Pacific Island countries gain as much as US$344 million per year in additional sustainable revenues and create 7,500 to 15,000 jobs by 2040.

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Fisheries Reforms Could Create US $344 Million in Extra Revenue: World Bank

Better management of Pacific tuna fisheries could allow countries to gain as much as $344 million in extra revenue per year, and create up to 15,000 jobs by the year 2040, according to a new World Bank report co-authored by the Nicholas Institute Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions' Ocean and Coastal Policy Program director John Virdin. In an interview with ABC Pacific Beat, Virdin says its important for the region to build on the hard work that's already been done to reform fisheries.

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U.N. Climate Deal: Are we Done?

In the largest ever single-day turn-out for a signing ceremony, more than 170 governments on April 22 signed the Paris Agreement, which has a goal of limiting average surface temperatures to “well below” 2 degrees Celsius. Voice of America asked experts if the agreement solves climate change globally. Brian Murray, director of the Environmental Economics Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, says the real test is “whether the countries will actually take action."In the largest ever single-day turn-out for a signing ceremony, more than 170 governments on April 22 signed the Paris Agreement, which has a goal of limiting average surface temperatures to “well below” 2 degrees Celsius. Voice of America asked experts if the agreement solves climate change globally. Brian Murray, director of the Environmental Economics Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, says the real test is “whether the countries will actually take action."

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Scientists Call for New Strategy to Study Climate Change Impacts on Coral Reefs

An international research team, which includes the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions' Linwood Pendleton, calls for a targeted research strategy to better understand the impact multiple stressors will have on coral reef in the future due to global climate change. The scientists published their new approach to coral reef research in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science.

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Study Finds Impacts to Coral Reefs Underestimated

In a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science, the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions’ Linwood Pendleton—with co-authors from the University of Miami, the University of Queensland and the University of Brest—report that evidence is stacking up to suggest that impacts to coral reefs may be underestimated. In a Q&A, Pendleton says that’s not all. By themselves, current scientific studies do not fully capture the complexity or number of environmental changes the reefs face.

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Duke Kunshan to Offer New Professional Degree in Environmental Policy

Duke Kunshan University will offer a new international master’s degree in environmental policy (IMEP) beginning in the fall of 2017. The four-semester, 16-course program is designed to meet the growing global need for leaders who are versed in both Chinese and international environmental issues and policies. Billy Pizer of the Sanford School and the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutionsis among the faculty members that spearheaded the program’s creation.

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U.S. Federal Government Sends Agencies to Bat — For Nature and People

A memorandum released last week by the White House Office of Management and Budget, Council on Environmental Quality, and Office of Science and Technology Policy recognizes the power all U.S. federal agencies hold to affect human lives by changing nature, and asks them to act like it. The Nicholas Institute's Lydia Olander and the Nature Conservancy's Heather Tallis write about how agencies will consider the value of ecosystem services in decision making on the Cool Green Science blog. 

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Mangrove Forests Help Keep our Heads Above Water—and Marine Protected Areas Help them Help Us

On Earth Magazine reports on a new study from Duke University researchers finding that conservation measures in Indonesia—home to the world’s largest area of mangrove forests—prevented the loss of around 35,000 acres of mangrove habitat between 2000 and 2010. By leaving these forests alone, about 13 million metric tons of stored carbon didn’t get released into the atmosphere. 

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Carbon Dioxide and Mangroves: Equivalent to Removing Cars From Road

Mangrove conservation efforts not only prevent habitat loss, but also help regulate carbon dioxide emissions. Nature World News details a study by researchers from Duke that indicates protected areas in Indonesia have maintained 35,594 acres of mangrove habitats and prevented the release into the atmosphere of about 13 million metric tons of carbon dioxide that the mangrove roots help store.  

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