State Policy Program News

Timing is the Element Most Likely to Change in EPA's Final Clean Power Plan ($)

In countless meetings on the Clean Power Plan with states and energy companies, the most common plea to U.S. EPA has been for more time. More time to work on plans, more time to allow coal plants to retire and more time to move toward final goals. Jonas Monast, director of the Climate and Energy Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, discusses what to look for in the final Clean Power Plan rule in ClimateWire.

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NC Wind Farm Could Mean Changing Winds in Ga. Energy Future

Wind farms dot the landscape in states across the country, but you won’t find one in the Southeast, at least not yet, according to a wind industry trade group. That is until now. On NPR, Jonas Monast, director of the Climate and Energy Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, discusses the implications of this new $400 million, 200-plus megawatt facility in North Carolina.

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Nicholas Institute's Monast Outlines Key Issues to Watch in Clean Power Plan Rollout ($)

With U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set to release its final Clean Power Plan over the next few weeks, what are the key changes to watch for in the agency's rollout of the rule? On E&E TV's OnPoint, Jonas Monast, director of the Climate and Energy Program at Duke's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, discusses the critical elements of the draft proposal that are likely to face changes in the final rule. Monast also talks about the range of options that exist for states that are considering a multistate compliance mechanism.

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South Getting its First Big Wind Farm Soon

On a vast tract of old North Carolina farmland, crews are getting ready to build something the South has never seen: a commercial-scale wind energy farm. Jonas Monast of Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions discusses factors forcing change in the region's energy market in the Associated Press.

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Environmental Groups: How U.S. Supreme Court's EPA Ruling Could Impact North Carolina

In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency erred by not accounting for the economic cost of the Mercury and Air Toxic Standards, which required coal-fired power plants to install scrubbers that limit the release of mercury and other pollutants. Jonas Monast, director the Climate and Energy Program at Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, tells the Triangle Business Journal that the immediate effects of the ruling on North Carolina are likely to be limited because many power plants in the state have already moved to comply with the EPA regulations.

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Water and Big Data: 21st Century Solution to 21st Century Droughts

In the Contra Costa Times, the Nicholas Institute's Lauren Patterson and Martin Doyle write that California should be taking the lead in water management—much like it's led on climate issues—by using smart water metering, sensors and data analytics for utilities. They say that investing in water metering and data analytics could help California better manage the water it has in times of drought and beyond.

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To Meet Obama’s Carbon-Cutting Goals, States Work Together

States may be suing the Obama administration over a new effort to slash the carbon dioxide emissions from power plants, but they’re also exploring the most efficient ways to comply with a rule that will accelerate the displacement of coal and alter the energy sources of utilities. One major theme that’s emerging: finding ways to work across state lines. This article in Governing mentions the Nicholas Institute’s work ongoing series of workshops for Southeastern officials to explore compliance pathways and to weigh their tradeoffs.

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Virginia, Coal Country for Centuries, Now Embraces Carbon Regulations

This Inside Climate News story notes that the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality is already preparing for the Clean Power Plan’s final release by this summer. Officials have been meeting with stakeholders, including utility companies and green leaders, as well as with climate and energy experts at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University and the Georgetown Climate Center at Georgetown University.

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EPA Clean Power Plan Reenergizes the U.S. Climate Policy Debate

For the first time this summer, the nation’s fleet of existing power plants will face limits on carbon dioxide emissions. Depending on whom you ask, the release of the EPA’s final Clean Power Plan is either an important step in addressing the challenge of climate change, an example of overreach by the federal government or largely insignificantUnderstanding the structure and potential impacts of the Clean Power Plan requires some context, which the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions' Jonas Monast discusses in The Conversation.

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Utilities, Enviro Groups Find Some Common Ground on Clean Power Plan Compliance ($)

EnergyWire reports on a conference held just weeks before the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is expected to release the final version of the Clean Power Plan, starting the clock for states to develop compliance plans. At the conference, there was also strong consensus that state implementation plans that enable trading of emissions allowances could reduce costs of complying with the rule. And trading would be more easily achieved among states that adopt mass-based standards.

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