Events

Constructing Africa’s Future: The Environmental and Social Implications of Chinese-Financed Infrastructure in Africa

WEATHER ALERT: All Thursday programming associated with this event has been cancelled. An abridged version of Friday's programming will take place 10 a.m.-noon as long as Duke University is open.

The abridged panel on Friday will include the following speakers:

  • Howard French, (virtual attendance) School of Journalism, Columbia University

From Going Out to One Belt One Road – Understanding China’s Africa Policies in a Global Perspective

  • Michelle Lee, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University

Green and Blue conservation agendas alongside Chinese development in Gabon

  • April Raphiou, International Communications Consultant

The framing of Chinese engagement in Kenya and Nigeria as portrayed through local media

  • Jackson Ewing, Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions

The Inconsistency of China’s Environmental Impacts in Africa

  • Tao Hu, WWF China Program

Greening Infrastructure along the Belt and Road

  • Jingjing Zhang, Environmental Law Institute, Georgetown University

Chinese overseas investment: the environmental and social impact and legal accountability 

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Hear leading academics, journalists, policymakers, and NGO experts discuss the environmental and social Implications of Chinese-financed infrastructure in Africa on Thursday, January 18 and Friday, January 19 on the Duke University campus. The workshop will assess how Duke/DKU and partner institutions can contribute to infrastructure planning in Africa so as to optimize its impact on the environment and global health. Please register in advance if you plan to attend.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

3 p.m. Elizabeth Losos:  Welcome and Duke Green Belt and Road Initiative Overview

3:10 p.m. Panel 1: Setting the Stage for Chinese’s Belt and Road in Africa? 

  • Stephen Smith, Duke African and African American Studies, Duke. An Old Story Writ Large: Novelty and Path Fidelity in China's engagement with Africa
  • Howard French, School of Journalism, Columbia University. From Going Out to One Belt One Road: Understanding China's Africa Policies in a Global Perspective
  • Jackson Ewing, Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. The Inconsistency of China’s Environmental Impacts in Africa
  • Prasenjit Duara, Duke Global Asia Initiative, moderator

4:30 p.m.  Public reception and remarks

5 p.m. Panel 2: What drives Chinese Infrastructure investments in Africa?            

  • Nama Ouattara, George Washington University. Social and Environmental Responsibility in Africa: Learning from Angola, DRC and Mali Cases
  • Tao Hu, WWF China Program. Greening Infrastructure along the Belt and Road
  • Indermit Gill, Duke Center for International Development. The End of Aid
  • Erika Weinthal, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, moderator
Friday, January 19, 2018

9 a.m.  Panel 3: Chinese infrastructure expansion and its impact on the environment and human wellbeing

  • Michelle Lee, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University. The Tradeoff between National Priorities of Biodiversity Conservation and Chinese Investment in Gabon 
  • Jingjing Zhang, Environmental Law Institute, Georgetown University. Chinese Overseas Investment: The Environmental and Social Impact and Legal Accountability 
  • April Raphiou, International Communications Consultant. The Framing of Chinese Engagement in Kenya and Nigeria as Portrayed through Local Media
  • Charles Muiruri, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University - moderator

10:45 a.m. Wrap up session

The event is sponsored by the Duke Green Belt and Road Initiative, an initiative of the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and Duke Kunshan University that draws together colleagues from across Duke to address the environmental and social impacts of China’s new Silk Road infrastructure investments in Asia and Africa. The event is funded by the Duke Africa Initiative and the Nicholas Institute.