News - Environmental Data and Analysis

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The idea of an Internet of Water was first conceived at the Aspen Institute Dialog Series on Water Data, and formalized in the 2017 report “The Internet of Water: Sharing and Integrating Water Data for Sustainability.” This concept built on earlier academic work in water science, as well the federal government’s Open Water Data Initiative (OWDI), which substantially improved access to federal water data sets.

Duke University experts will share insights about international climate policy with university students across the nation in a free virtual seminar series funded by the U.S. Department of State. The series is also open to the Duke community, including students, faculty, staff, and alumni.

Rising to the Moment

Duke Today took a look at new opportunities emerging around the university for Duke scholars and students to have a greater climate impact—with more on the way.

One of Duke University’s signature summer education programs is expanding student opportunities to apply cutting-edge data science methods to climate challenges.

Lauren Patterson wrote for the Internet of Water's blog about the water affordability dashboard, key findings from it, and how it will be supported by an Internet of Water.

Utilities and their customers face growing challenges to the affordability of basic water services in communities across the country. Over the last year, the Nicholas Institute’s Water Policy Program has been exploring the causes and scale of these challenges and ways to potentially address them.

One-third of the tens of thousands of mile-long river segments in the United States have noticeably shifted color in satellite images since 1984, according to a study in the journal Geographical Research Letters. Martin Doyle told the Associated Press that the study "shows how most every aspect of our planet is being affected by humans."

An interdisciplinary group from two universities is taking a data-driven approach to help protect North Carolina’s drinking water supply.

Martin Doyle spoke with scilog about the challenges of bridging research and policy, regaining trust in public institutions, one-page memos, and windows of opportunity.

The New Republic reports that the massive Aliso Canyon storage field, which contained more than 110 underground wells, is just a small part of America’s much larger natural gas infrastructure. Approximately 15,000 such wells are active across the United States, and nearly half of them are concentrated in six states: Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Michigan, New York, and California.