News - Ashley Ward

Heat seasons are lasting longer each year as temperatures continue to rise with climate change. Ashley Ward, director of the Heat Policy Innovation Hub, talked with The Chronicle about the implications for North Carolina, the role of Duke researchers in identifying solutions and the hub's collaboration with state and local partners to develop a Heat Action Plan Toolkit.

The death toll from an already record-breaking summer will increase, but experts tell USA Today that the numbers won't ever be right. Ashley Ward, director of the Heat Policy Innovation Hub, explained that death certificates often identify a stroke or heart attack, for example, as a a patient's primary cause of death, while any references to heat exposure may only be found deep in the notes from an emergency room doctor.

 

 

It's one of the hottest summers on record in the state of North Carolina—and extreme temperatures are putting some of the state's most vulnerable residents at risk. Ashley Ward, director of the Duke University Heat Policy Innovation Hub, joined WUNC's Due South to discuss tips for cooling down in extremely hot environments.

Due to how heat-related deaths are reported and classified, the final toll of the current heat wave across the U.S. will likely be an undercount, reports The Washington Post. However, reporting and classification practices are improving, said Ashley Ward, director of the Duke University Heat Policy Innovation Hub. “The extreme nature of the heat last summer and this summer has meant it’s in the forefront of everyone’s mind, including those in charge of classifying health outcomes and deaths,” Ward said.

Ashley Ward, director of the Heat Policy Innovation Hub, spoke with WKNC's Eye on the Triangle show about the heat wave that has taken over several areas of North Carolina, including the Triangle. Ward explores the impacts of the heat wave on local communities and the environment, gives recommendations for North Carolinians and provides potential future solutions to boost heat resilience in the community.

The inaugural HeatWise Policy Partnership Summit convened more than 100 leaders from different sectors and parts of the country for three days to identify ways to make communities more heat resilient. The summit brought together executives from leading financial and insurance companies, high-ranking federal and state officials, foundation officers and Duke faculty, as well as community organizers whose work supports vulnerable populations.

Heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths in the United States. How can you protect your health in extremely hot weather? Ashley Ward, director of the Duke University Heat Policy Innovation Hub, offers ten tips for staying safe when it's hot.

Most strategies in the United States for helping people stay cool during extreme heat are geared toward urban areas, leaving vulnerable rural populations behind. “We need interventions that fit the environment,” Ashley Ward, director of the Duke University Heat Policy Innovation Hub, told The New York Times.

Duke University experts are warning of health dangers from a massive heat dome moving toward the eastern United States, which may endanger human health due to a prolonged period of high temperatures, reported Enlace Latino NC. “This heat dome is hitting relatively early in this year’s heat season, so there are large numbers of people who haven’t yet acclimatized to high temperatures,” said Ashley Ward, director of the Duke University Heat Policy Innovation Hub.

“Everyone is vulnerable to heat. You can be a person in good shape and good health and still succumb to heat exposure,” said Ashley Ward, director of the Duke University Heat Policy Innovation Hub. With forecasts calling for “increasingly oppressive heat” in the Triangle this weekend, Ward talked with The News & Observer about how people can stay safe.