News - Martin Doyle

When it comes to water, critical decisions are made every day, regardless of data availability. But what if we could harness more data to make better-informed decisions? The Internet of Water seeks to fundamentally change how we manage water by improving access to more water data for real-time decision-making.

Hurricane Florence brought much damage to the North Carolina coast and it’s clear that the work of recovery will take years. The expertise of Duke faculty will contribute to that work.

In The Chronicle, The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions' Lauren Patterson and Martin Doyle discuss their research project investigating the target levels and management goals over time of dams and reservoirs. 

Over the past week, rivers in North Carolina have broken previous flood records, many of which were set by Hurricane Matthew just two years earlier, write Martin Doyle and Lauren Patterson in the Herald Sun.

Hurricane Florence dropped two to three feet of rain, causing major flooding along the Cape Fear, Lumberton, and Neuse rivers—destroying property and highlighting the limits of our country’s infrastructure, write Duke's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions' Martin Doyle and Lauren Patterson in the News & Observer. 

Water infrastructure in the western United States was funded in the early and mid-20th Century by federal financing through the Bureau of Reclamation, but such financing has declined in recent decades and there has been increased interest in alternative approaches to infrastructure funding.

Hurricane Florence has caused havoc with North Carolina's infrastructure since it began hammering the coastline last week. Hog farms are one of the most problematic environmental challenges after Florence dumped a historic amount of rain on the region, but they’re far from the only one.

America’s rivers have had many different uses over the years since colonial days. The Mercury discusses Nicholas Institute Water Policy Program director Martin Doyle’s new book “The Source,” offering that it examines rivers and the reasons for them. 

The Duke Chronicle discusses what NC residents might expect from Hurricane Florence. Nicholas Institute Water Policy Program Director Martin Doyle tells the paper “With major towns all near rivers and coasts, these are societally changing decisions. As sea levels rise, of course it’s going to get worse.”

With Hurricane Florence churning toward the coastline of North and South Carolina, a panel of Duke experts that included Martin Doyle, Water Policy Program director at Duke's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, discussed ways to weather the storm and what might happen once the storm is over and communities begin to rebuild.