News - Transportation Electrification

Are you a Duke University alum with plans (or potential plans) to attend Climate Week NYC (September 22-29) or the UNFCCC’s Conference of Parties (COP29) in Baku, Azerbaijan (November 11-22)? Duke University experts will again take part in these important convenings alongside climate thought leaders and decision-makers from across the world—and we are eager to connect with Duke alumni who will also be joining.

A new Nicholas Institute report, co-authored by Duke University graduate student Nicholas Sommer and Nicholas Institute expert Trey Gowdy, analyzes growth patterns of electric vehicle charging infrastructure in a dozen Southeastern states during 2023.

The National Association of State Energy Officials, The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, and the Nicholas Institute recently released a report reviewing Southeast transportation electrification workforce development training programs. In this webinar, Nicholas Institute research lead Trey Gowdy presented the major findings.

Supporting electric vehicle manufacturing, repair and infrastructure is increasingly important as EVs make up an ever-greater percentage of on-road vehicles. Nicholas Institute research lead Trey Gowdy, in collaboration with the National Association of State Energy Officials and the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, wrote a new report that provides an essential inventory of workforce development and training programs directly related to transportation electrification in the Southeast.

The Southeast Electric Transportation Regional Initiative (SETRI), which is co-facilitated by Duke's Nicholas Institute and the Georgia Tech Strategic Energy Institute, was named one of three finalists in the Transportation category of the 2023 Cleantech Innovation Awards. The Research Triangle Cleantech Cluster will announce the winners during a ceremony on Nov. 16.

The new Office of Climate and Sustainability brings together several of Duke University's climate, energy, and environmental assets—including the Nicholas Institute—to help advance the mission of the Duke Climate Commitment.

China recently unearthed a rare ore that could further boost its electric vehicle sector, reports NewsweekJackson Ewing, director of energy and climate policy at the Nicholas Institute, told the magazine that China dominates the supply and refinement of raw materials necessary for EV batteries.

As the electric vehicle (EV) market expands in the United States, the public and private sectors are rapidly investing in charging infrastructure to keep those vehicles on the road. One model identifies the need for 26 million to 35 million publicly accessible charging ports by 2030.

China currently dominates global supply chains for metals and minerals needed for electric vehicle batteries, solar panels, and more clean energy technology. By pursuing next-generation technologies, the United States could "alter what materials are the most important" for the clean energy transition, helping to narrow the gap with China, Jackson Ewing, director of energy and climate policy at the Nicholas Institute, told Newsweek.

A new online portal hosted by the Southeast Electric Transportation Regional Initiative highlights active funding sources, comment solicitations, research opportunities, events and other timely information related to transportation electrification in the Southeast.