News - John Virdin

The balance between protecting ocean resources and still relying on them for livelihoods is at the heart of what is known as the blue economy. Duke Stories explores how scholars across Duke, including at the Nicholas Institute, are working to expand humanity’s understanding of the ocean, consistent with the university's mission to seek solutions to the world's most pressing problems.

The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions is giving Duke University students a workout—for their environmental policy knowledge.

More than 40 students crammed into the fifth-floor boardroom of Grainger Hall on a Friday afternoon to get answers to their questions about the inner workings of Congress. The session was the first in a series of Policy Boot Camps that will feature Nicholas Institute professionals sharing their expertise engaging directly with decision-making institutions. 

Push-ups are being replaced by policy at the Nicholas Institute’s boot camps. 

Aimed at increasing student fluency in engaging with policy making institutions, the boot camps will draw from the experience of four policy experts and cover ways to engage with Congress, federal agencies and international institutions, reports The Chronicle.

Tim Profeta, director of the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, kicked off the first boot camp Oct. 25 to focus on the workings of Congress.

Small-scale fisheries are central to solving many problems in the oceans, such as overfishing or loss of natural habitats, as well as on land by addressing poverty and hunger in places where jobs and quality nutrition are limited, write John Virdin and Xavier Basurto.

The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University has awarded funding to six research projects for Fiscal Year 2019–20 through the institute's Catalyst Program.

Now in its third year, the Catalyst Program aims to build on the Nicholas Institute’s mission by increasing engagement with Duke faculty to incubate and advance new partnerships, enhance policy-relevant knowledge, and create innovative policy solutions based on new creative synergies.

Pacific Catalyst, a partnership of fishery management experts in collaboration with the University of the South Pacific (USP), today announced their official launch and described several projects they have underway. They also introduced their new website at PacificCatalyst.org.

The Illuminating Hidden Harvests study will provide critical knowledge and information on small-scale fisheries globally, informing the way forward for sustainable development of the sector. 

A new blog post by John Virdin, Director of the Ocean and Coast Policy Program, in chinadialogue ocean explores the outcomes when poorer coastal African nations and island countries try to make money by selling access to their fish-abundant waters to companies from richer countries with large fishing fleets.

John Virdin, director of the Ocean and Coastal Policy Program at Duke's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, was among the participants at the Workshop on Blue Natural Capital in Lisbon, Portugal.

A group of educators and professionals led by Transform Aqorau recently announced the formation of Pacific Catalyst, a partnership designed to foster new policies and a fresh generation of leaders in the Pacific Island fisheries.