News - Lydia Olander

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As rising sea levels cause marshes to move inland in six mid-Atlantic states, the coastal zone will not continue to serve as a carbon sink but release more carbon into the atmosphere, a new modeling study led by researchers at Duke University finds.

The Nicholas Institute has developed three online dashboards that make detailed data about North Carolina's forests, farmlands, and wetlands easily accessible to communities, land managers, non-governmental organizations, and the general public.

Lydia Olander, Ph.D. was cited by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for “Distinguished contributions of the field of ecosystem services, particularly for developing and promulgating methods to enhance environmental sustainability.”

Under normal circumstances, the Duke Leadership Academy offers participants a chance to challenge themselves, build connections and harness their collective brain power to offer Duke leaders insights into how Duke can work better.

But the academy’s 2020–21 class, which graduated from the program in December 2021, operated under nothing close to normal circumstances, convening in early 2020, prior to the pandemic, but then COVID-19 arrived, which put the academy on pause.

Discussions about where to focus investments in infrastructure and what to build are not informed by a complete accounting of the nation’s assets, leaving out many critical services that nature provides, write Stephen Posner, of the Gund Institute for Environment, and Lydia Olander, of the Nicholas Institute.

Convened by Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and Susan Bell & Associates, the new Resilience Roadmap project taps a broad spectrum of resilience experts to offer actionable recommendations that inform a national resilience agenda.

Lydia Olander and Katie Warnell spoke to The News & Observer about how sea level rise is affecting North Carolina's salt marshes and the importance of this habitat as a tool in efforts to fight climate change.

Led by Lydia Olander, a project to study the socioeconomic impacts of ecosystem restoration was among 20 projects awarded a combined $2.3 million by the NOAA RESTORE Science Program to scope and design research that will inform future decisions on how to manage natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico.

The Ashley National Forest has implemented and refined novel approaches to evaluate ecosystem services in a pilot project with Forest Service Research and Development, the Washington Office, Duke University and Environmental Management and Planning Solutions, Inc. as part of the forest plan revision process.

In a webinar hosted by The Pew Charitable Trusts, Lydia Olander and Katie Warnell discussed a model to map coastal carbon capture and storage—known as blue carbon—and existing coastal protection, which was then applied in states from New York to North Carolina.