News - Lauren Patterson

In a new blog post for the Internet of Water, Lauren Patterson, Senior Policy Associate for the Water Policy Program, writes, "The transition from one year to the next is often a time of reflection. How much more so when the past year, the start of a new decade, has brought such radical disruption and change to our society.

The Nicholas Institute is applying the expertise of its professionals to rapidly evolving environmental and energy issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Read four stories about how Nicholas Institute projects are meeting the moment.

Many of the reservoirs operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are decades old and subject to ever-changing environmental and social pressures that threaten their ability to function as intended. To better understand the state of these reservoirs, Martin Doyle and Lauren Patterson collaborated with the USACE to conduct a large-scale analysis.

The Aspen Institute Energy and Environment Program in partnership with the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University are pleased to announce the release of the summary report from the 2019 Aspen-Nicholas Water Forum: Ensuring Water Quality: Innovating on the Clean Water & Safe Drinking Water Acts for the 21st Century.

When it comes to water, critical decisions are made every day, regardless of data availability. But what if we could harness more data to make better-informed decisions? The Internet of Water seeks to fundamentally change how we manage water by improving access to more water data for real-time decision-making.

Hurricane Florence brought much damage to the North Carolina coast and it’s clear that the work of recovery will take years. The expertise of Duke faculty will contribute to that work.

In The Chronicle, The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions' Lauren Patterson and Martin Doyle discuss their research project investigating the target levels and management goals over time of dams and reservoirs. 

Over the past week, rivers in North Carolina have broken previous flood records, many of which were set by Hurricane Matthew just two years earlier, write Martin Doyle and Lauren Patterson in the Herald Sun.

Hurricane Florence dropped two to three feet of rain, causing major flooding along the Cape Fear, Lumberton, and Neuse rivers—destroying property and highlighting the limits of our country’s infrastructure, write Duke's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions' Martin Doyle and Lauren Patterson in the News & Observer. 

The Internet of Water, a new project to improve our nation’s water data infrastructure, has been awarded start-up support by six foundations.